How do I repair the self-closing hinge on a house door?

Written by paul massey
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How do I repair the self-closing hinge on a house door?
(Hemera Technologies/AbleStock.com/Getty Images)

A self-closing hinge is installed on a door has an automatic closing mechanism, and when the door no longer closes properly or completely, the hinge needs to be repaired. There are two basic repair options for a self-closing hinge on a door -- adjustment or replacement -- and either option is easy to determine and complete.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • Awl or 3/32-inch nailset
  • Screwdriver
  • New self-closing hinge (optional)

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Determine the adjustment needed to the self-closing hinge by opening the door and allowing it to close. If the door closes too hard, the spring tension of the hinge needs to be decreased, and if the door closes too slowly or doesn’t fully latch once closed, the spring tension must be increased.

  2. 2

    Close door to access the hinge’s tensioning ring located at the top or bottom end of the hinge’s spring cylinder. The tensioning ring is a thin horizontal ring with holes equally spaced around its perimeter, with one hole containing a metal pin that locks the tensioning ring’s position.

  3. 3

    Decrease the hinge’s spring tension by inserting the end of an awl or nailset into the tensioning ring at the second or third empty hole from the metal locking pin. Push the tensioning ring slightly toward the jamb to extract the metal pin, then move it to the next empty hole toward the jamb. Release the pressure on the tensioning ring and let the pin press against the hinge tab.

  4. 4

    Increase the hinge’s spring tension by inserting the end of an awl or nailset into the tensioning ring at the second empty hole from the metal locking pin and push the tensioning ring toward the jamb. Move the metal pin to the next empty hole toward the door side and release the tensioning ring to let it press against the hinge tab.

  5. 5

    Pull the door open, then allow the door to close to evaluate the spring tension adjustment. Repeat Step 3 or 4, as needed, to complete adjustment of the self-closing hinge until the door closes properly. If adjustment has not resolved the issue, the hinge no longer functions properly and should be replaced.

  1. 1

    Release the self-closing hinge’s spring tension completely following the procedure described in Section 1 Step 3.

  2. 2

    Open the door fully and remove the self-closing hinge’s jamb side leaf screws.

  3. 3

    Extract the remaining door hinge pins by tapping upward on the bottom of the pins using a hammer and nailset to remove the pins, then remove the door from the opening.

  4. 4

    Rest the door on the latch edge, with the hinges upward, and remove the existing self-closing hinge’s door-side leaf screws using a screwdriver.

  5. 5

    Open the new self-closing hinge and press the door-side hinge leaf into the hinge mortise with the spring tensioning ring on the hinge positioned toward the top of the door. Secure the self-closing hinge to the door using the screws provided.

  6. 6

    Reinstall the door into the opening and replace the hinge pins removed in Step 3 to hold the door in place.

  7. 7

    Open the door to access the screw-side of the hinges and secure the self-closing hinge’s leaf to the jamb using the screws provided.

  8. 8

    Close the door to adjust the new self-closing hinge’s spring tension following the procedure described in Step 4 of Section 1, inserting the end of an awl or nailset into the tensioning ring at the second empty hole from the metal locking pin, then pushing the tensioning ring toward the jamb to move the metal pin to the next empty hole toward the door side. Release the tensioning ring to let it press against the hinge tab and repeat the adjustment until the spring tension is sufficient to close the door in a smooth motion to fully engage the latch.

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