How to calculate ICC rankings

Written by jared beck
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How to calculate ICC rankings
Cricket rankings may seem complicated, but are easy to compute. (cricket image by PeteG from Fotolia.com)

The International Cricket Council (ICC) is the international governing body for cricket. Currently with over 105 member countries, the ICC awards championship trophies to the nation with the highest rating in both Test and One-Day International (ODI) leagues. Test cricket matches can last up to five days with each day broken into three sections punctuated by lunch and tea breaks. ODI cricket matches are the faster alternative, typically completed in one day, with a maximum of 50 overs permitted per team. An "over" is defined as a set of six balls bowled consecutively. The ICC employs ratings formulas for both leagues to determine a champion.

Skill level:
Easy

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Add one point to a team for winning a match, after a series between two teams; add a half-point to both teams for drawing a match. Add a bonus point to the team that won the series; add a half-point to each team if the series ended in a draw.

  2. 2

    Multiply the team's series result by 50 points more than the opponent's rating, if the ratings gap between the two teams was less than 40 points at the start of the series. Then add that total to the opponent's series result multiplied by 50 points less than the opponent's rating.

  3. 3

    Multiply the stronger team's series result by 10 points more than their own rating (if the ratings gap was equal to or more than 40 points), then add that total to the opponent's series result multiplied by 90 points less than the team's own rating. The weaker team multiplies its series result by 90 points more than their own rating, then adds that total to the opponent's series result multiplied by 10 points less than the team's rating.

  4. 4

    Add the new points totals to the team's points total before the series began. Remove points from matches that no longer fall within the past three years. Update the number of matches by adding one more than the number of games in a series. For example, if a series lasted two matches, you would add three matches to the total.

  5. 5

    Divide the updated points total by the updated match total. This represents the team's rating, and comparisons of ratings will yield the team's ranking.

  1. 1

    Add one point to a team for winning the match, after a series between two teams, and a half-point to each team for a draw.

  2. 2

    Score 50 points more than the opponent's rating for the winner if the gap between the two teams at the outset of the match was less than 40 points. Score 50 points fewer than the opponent's rating. In case of a tie, each team scores the opponent's rating.

  3. 3

    Score 10 points more than the stronger team's rating in a win or 90 points fewer than its rating in a loss (if the gap between teams' ratings was more than or equal to 40 points). The weaker team scores 90 points more than its rating for a win or 10 points fewer than its rating for a loss. For ties, the stronger team scores 40 points fewer than its rating and the weaker team scores 40 points more than its rating.

  4. 4

    Add the new point totals to the existing point total for each team before the series started. Update the match numbers, as well. Throw out all points and matches that no longer fall within the last three years.

  5. 5

    Divide the new points total by the new matches total. This will provide the rating for each team, and ratings comparisons will order the teams into rankings.

Tips and warnings

  • For test cricket, matches within the first two years of the three-year window count as half the number of points.
  • For ODI cricket, matches in the first year count as one-third, and matches in the second year count as two-thirds.

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