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How to Test My Wi-Fi Speed

Updated February 21, 2017

Testing your connection speed is an important way of diagnosing any potential problems you may experience with your home network. Wireless routers, used to create Wi-Fi networks, can drastically slow down your Internet connection if they are experiencing malfunctions. Understanding a simple process for testing you upload and download speed over a Wi-Fi network is instrumental to maintaining your home network.

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Run a speed test on Speedtest.net. Open an Internet browser and type in "speedtest.net" in the address bar. Press "Enter" and you should see Speedtest.net's main page.

Select a server. Speed test sites like Speedtest.net will nearly always require you to select a server to ping before your speed test begins. Speedtest.net approximates your position with an animated rotating yellow star on the map of the US. Hover your mouse over the star and you will be able to select from a list of the cities in the area. Simply select the city that is closest to you if your exact city is not listed.

Run several speed tests and evaluate the results. As a general rule, running three or more speed tests will cover any minor variations that may occur between tests. See what Internet speeds are guaranteed by your ISP and compare them to your test results. If you use a separate Internet modem connected to a wireless router, you can also rerun the speed tests with the wireless router bypassed and the modem directly connected to your computer to check if the wireless router is causing a slowdown of your Internet speeds on your Wi-Fi network.

Run speed tests on Speakeasy. You can use generally the same procedure to test your Wi-Fi speeds on other websites like speakeasy.net. Keep in mind that Speakeasy has a more limited selection of cities from which to choose than does Speedtest.net; again simply choose the city that is closest to you is your exact city is not listed.

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About the Author

Eoghan McCloskey is a technical support representative and part-time musician who holds Bachelor of Arts degrees in English and political science from Texas State University. While at Texas State, McCloskey worked as a writing tutor at the Texas State Writing Center, proofreading and editing everything from freshman book reports to graduate theses.

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