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How to split the view on a single PC monitor

Updated March 23, 2017

Many people use dual monitors to have extra work space on their computer and view program applications and documents side by side. Though having one monitor may limit your capabilities, Windows operating systems provide built-in functionality so that you can effectively split the view on a PC monitor. Windows XP and Vista allow you to "tile" program windows across the screen, and Windows 7 has its "Aero Snap" features that make it relatively simple to split your monitor's view.

Open two or more programs or application files that you want to view in a split screen.

Click on the name of one of the programs at the bottom of your screen in the taskbar to select and highlight it. Press and hold "Ctrl," and click on the name of a second open program shown in the taskbar to highlight it.

Right-click one of the highlighted programs in the taskbar. Click "Tile Vertically" or "Tile Horizontally" in Windows XP or "Show Windows Stacked" or "Show Windows Side by Side" in Windows Vista to display the programs side by side in a split screen or stacked on top of each other in landscape view.

Open one or two programs or document files that you want to view in a split screen on your computer monitor.

Click once on a program window to select it. Press and hold the Windows logo key on your keyboard. Press the right arrow key to snap the program window to the right side of the monitor.

Click once on a second program window to select it. Press and hold the Windows logo key on the keyboard. Press the left arrow key to snap the program window to the left side of the monitor.

Tip

In Windows 7, you can also drag a program window's "title bar" to either side of the monitor to "snap" it into position to the left or right side of the screen.

Things You'll Need

  • Windows XP, Vista or 7
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About the Author

Matthew Schieltz has been a freelance web writer since August 2006, and has experience writing a variety of informational articles, how-to guides, website and e-book content for organizations such as Demand Studios. Schieltz holds a Bachelor of Arts in psychology from Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio. He plans to pursue graduate school in clinical psychology.