How to Apply for a Log Book

Written by stephen benham
  • Share
  • Tweet
  • Share
  • Pin
  • Email
How to Apply for a Log Book
Apply for a log book to ensure your car is registered in the U.K. (red register sign on green image by timur1970 from Fotolia.com)

Failing to register your car with the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) in the U.K. is a serious offence. Your U.K. vehicle log book is the colloquial term for a vehicle registration certificate (V5C). It is an important document and contains detailed information about your vehicle. It is needed to provide proof on ownership. Without your log book, you are unable to sell or transfer ownership of your vehicle. You cannot apply for a log book online but you can download a form to apply for a log book.

Skill level:
Easy

Other People Are Reading

Instructions

  1. 1

    Go to the UK Directgov website (see Resources) to apply for a log book.

  2. 2

    Click "Download an application form for a Vehicle Registration Certificate -- (form V62)" to apply for a log book in the U.K.

  3. 3

    Click "Print" on your browser and then follow your usual print procedure. Ensure you have plenty of coloured ink in your printer, as the form is detailed with a blue background colour.

  4. 4

    Read the instructions printed on the first page carefully. Complete the application form. All details must be accurate. If you make a mistake, it's best to print another form and start over.

  5. 5

    Check through the application form. Enclose the fee of £25. This can be paid by check or postal order made payable to DVLA Swansea.

  6. 6

    Mail the application form and fee to: DVLA, Swansea, SA99 1DD. You will receive you new log book in two to four weeks.

Tips and warnings

  • You don't need to pay the £25 fee if you are the new owner and the previous owner failed to inform DVLA about the change. You will need to send in section (V5C/2) from the V5C with your application.
  • It is a serious offence to provide knowingly false or inaccurate information. You may be liable to a fine or, at worst, imprisonment.

Don't Miss

Filter:
  • All types
  • Articles
  • Slideshows
  • Videos
Sort:
  • Most relevant
  • Most popular
  • Most recent

No articles available

No slideshows available

No videos available

By using the eHow.co.uk site, you consent to the use of cookies. For more information, please see our Cookie policy.