How to Cut a Rough Ruby

Written by sharon harleigh
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How to Cut a Rough Ruby
A well-cut ruby can be used to create beautiful, timeless jewelery. (ruby romance image by Jake Hellbach from Fotolia.com)

Rubies are beautiful, sparkling red gemstones that are part of the sapphire family. A well cut ruby is hard to find because natural rubies are rare. Additionally, jewellers will tend towards cutting the stone to maintain its size, which is not always a good cut to bring out the maximum shine and sparkle in the stone. A good cut can increase the value of the stone and bring out shine and sparkle that will not be found in a shallowly cut stone.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • Jeweller's loop
  • Gem cutting machine

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Use a jeweller's loop to examine uncut rubies for any potential flaws that can create weakness in the stone. You need to be aware of the properties of your stone thoroughly before beginning to cut.

    How to Cut a Rough Ruby
    Rough rubies can be cut into beautiful sparkling gems. (heart shaped necklace image by Alx from Fotolia.com)
  2. 2

    Sharpen your gem cutter. You need the machine to be as sharp as possible to maximise your cutting ability and shorten the time required for this task.

  3. 3

    Cut the ruby slowly and carefully using the sharpened gem cutting machine. Slow, methodical strokes are the key to not over-cutting your stone. Cut rubies carefully with a depth percentage of 65% to 80% to maintain depth, which adds to colour and lustre. A more shallow cut makes the ruby look washed out and pale in colour and is slightly transparent. A quality cut provides a rich red colour. Although a deep cut creates a smaller stone, the quality increases the value.

    How to Cut a Rough Ruby
    A pale colour indicates a poorly cut ruby. (Jewellery image by Sergey Yakovenko from Fotolia.com)

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