DISCOVER
×

How to change a toyota starter

Updated February 21, 2017

When the starter stops working in your Toyota vehicle, you will know it by the telltale clicking it makes when the solenoid does not engage properly. No matter how many times you will attempt to start the car, the engine will not "turn." Instead, you will just hear the clicking sound. The starter in a Toyota is generally located under the vehicle, but the location depends on the type of engine installed in your particular vehicle. The placement of the starter causes slight variations in the replacement process.

Place the front of the Toyota on jack stands to increase the amount of working room under the vehicle.

Remove the negative (black) battery cable from the battery.

Locate the starter under the vehicle. On engines that are installed sideways, the starter is located on the left side of the engine, behind the trans axle. On engines that are mounted in the front-to-back position, the starter is located on the right side of the engine, next to the bell housing.

Remove the bolt that attaches the large, black ground wire the starter; pull the wire off the threaded stud. Thread the nut back onto the stud to avoid losing it.

Remove the wiring harness from the starter solenoid. On some Toyota models, such as the Celica, the oxygen sensor wiring harness connects to the side of the starter via a wire loom. Disconnect the harness from the wire loom.

Remove the two bolts that secure the starter to the engine and then pull on the starter in an outward direction to remove the starter gear from the flywheel. If you cannot reach the upper mounting bolt on engines mounted sideways, remove the air intake box and the battery to gain access to the bolt from above.

Place the new starter into position and tighten the mounting bolts. Reconnect any wire looms removed during the starter removal process.

Reconnect the wire harness to the starter solenoid and reconnect the ground wire to the starter, then reconnect the ground wire to the battery.

Things You'll Need

  • Jack
  • Jack stands
  • Socket set
bibliography-icon icon for annotation tool Cite this Article

About the Author

Since 2006 Zyon Silket has been writing for companies such as SEOWhat, L&C Freelancing and T-Mobile Wireless. He has extensive experience working in supervisory roles within the wireless and Internet technologies fields. Silket is pursuing a Bachelor of Arts in business management and network technologies at Lehigh Carbon Community College.