How to Find a Becker Serial Number

Written by stephanie ellen
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How to Find a Becker Serial Number
Becker clocks were produced in the 19th century. (clock image by Svetlin Rusev from Fotolia.com)

Gustav Becker, born in 1819, was a German clockmaker in the latter half of the 19th century. Becker gained recognition for his clocks after he won a Golden medal for design at the 1852 Silesia Trade Exposition and at the height of production, his workshops produced over 400 clock varieties from simple to elaborate designs. Becker clocks were almost exclusively weight-driven regulator wall clocks which bore his initials on the weights. Serial numbers on Becker clocks indicate which year the clock was manufactured.

Skill level:
Easy

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Locate the clock dial on your Becker clock.

  2. 2

    Look for the serial number anywhere on the dial. The serial number contains numbers only.

  3. 3

    Determine the age of your clock according to the serial number in the following list:

    Year (Serial Number)

    1850 (480 - 3,999)

    1860 (4,000 - 9,999)

    1863 (10,000 - 14,999)

    1865 (15,000 - 24,999)

    1867 (25,000 - 49,999)

    1872 (50,000 - 99,999)

    1875 (100,000 - 259,999)

    1880 (260,000 - 499,999)

    1885 (500,000 - 799,999)

    1890 (800,000 - 999,999)

    1892 (1,000,000 - 1,499,999)

    1900 (1,500,000 - 1,849,999)

    1913 (1,850,000 - 1,859,999)

    1923 (1,860,000 - 1,945,398)

    1925 (1,945,399 - 2,244,867)

    1926 (2,244,868)

Tips and warnings

  • Clocks built between 1927 and 1935 under the Becker name bear low serial numbers, starting at 0001.
  • The serial number ranges represent possible serial numbers for the years listed. The serial numbers were set periodically to an even number like "4,000" to make it easier to identify the year range in which a particular clock was built. That means that there weren't necessarily 3,999 clocks built before 1860, for example, but that 4,000 was chosen because the numbers were approaching 4,000 anyway, and Becker wanted to make clocks built after 1860 easier to identify as such.

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