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How to make a Princess Leia costume out of a sheet

Updated July 20, 2017

Princess Leia Organa, one of the main protagonists of the original "Star Wars" films, has become a symbol of feminine strength and power. She has been copied and emulated by girls for nearly 40 years and remains a popular subject for fancy dress costumes. Most remember her as they first saw her: in the long white robe and honey bun hairdo of the first film. The robe can be made easily with a couple of flat, twin-size sheets and minimal sewing skills.

Sew the two sheets together along the narrow edge. Leave a 30 cm (12 inch) gap in the centre for your head.

Pull the sheets over your head so that one sheet is behind you and the other is in front.

Pin the sheets together at the wrists, under the arms, at the waist and at the hem line. You will either need a model or someone to pin it for you. Be generous -- the robe should fit rather loosely. And the sleeves should be wider at the wrist than under the arms.

Pull the sheets off over your head and lay flat. Draw a line from the wrist pin to under the arm pin to the waist pin to the hem pin. This is your sew line. Draw another line about 2.5 cm (1 inch) away from this line. This is your cut line. Repeat with the other side. You will now have a drawing of your robe on the top sheet

Cut along the cut line through both sheets. Sew the two sheets together along the sew line.

Turn the robe inside out. Cut and hem to the length you want.

Stretch and pin two 27.5 cm (9 inch) pieces of elastic to the inside of each sleeve. Sew them on.

Wear the costume with a high-neck white top, white boots and a chain belt.

Things You'll Need

  • 2 Sheets
  • Fabric marker
  • Sewing machine
  • Safety pins
  • Scissors
  • Elastic
  • White boots
  • White shirt with mock turtle collar
  • Gold chain belt
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About the Author

Kathy Bellamy was a writer/producer for the Eternal Word Television Network for 17 years. She developed and scripted many of the short interstitials on the lives of the saints, educational segments for children’s programming and on-air promos.