How to size hockey jerseys

Written by daniel holzer
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How to size hockey jerseys
Get the right size hockey jersey for your purposes. (jeune joueur de hockey (2) image by fotogisèle from Fotolia.com)

Many hockey fans buy NHL replica jerseys to show their support of their favourite team. While they are expensive, often well over £65, hockey jerseys are made to withstand a lot of abuse both on and off the ice. Getting the right size, however, can be tricky as jerseys are designed for players who wear a lot of protective gear underneath them. However, knowing your measurements and fit preference can make sizing your hockey jersey quick and easy.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • Tailor’s measuring tape
  • Pen and paper
  • Store’s hockey jersey sizing chart

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Measure your chest. Wrap the tape around your body, bringing it under your armpits and straight across your chest. Write down the measurement.

  2. 2

    Compare your measurement to a hockey jersey sizing chart from the store where you are purchasing it, or from a website if you're buying online.

  3. 3

    Round up if your measurement is not exact to a size on the chart and purchase that size. For example, if your results were 42 inches and the chart says medium goes to 40 inches with large beginning at 44 inches, buy the large size.

Tips and warnings

  • Hockey jerseys are made to allow for shoulder pads and a girdle to be worn underneath them. If you want to buy a casual jersey to be worn off the ice, you can easily go down a size from your chart results.
  • Reebok’s NHL jerseys are more form-fitting, so if you want a more classic fit, buy a size larger than your chart results.
  • When buying for children, feel free to go a size above their chart results as kids grow quickly and jerseys are expensive.

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