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How to register a new address with a post office

If you are moving to a new address, it is important to let the post office know. You want to make sure your mail stops going to the old address and you receive everything sent to the new address. The Post Office allows this to be done with a simple online form for a nominal fee. The Post Office offers this method for convenience, accuracy, speed and security.

Prepare your new mailbox. In some dense residential areas and multi-unit housing complexes, the post office delivery person may request that you put your name in the mailbox in order to start delivery. In most apartments, this is done for you. If you are simply moving into a new residence for the first time and do not need to forward any old mail, you do not need to complete the steps below.

Gather your old address, new address and credit card and point your web browser to usps.com and click on "Change Your Address." It is also a good idea to have a list of bills and magazines that you want moved to the new address. The post office offers a notification service that you can complete while filling out the change of address forms.

Click on the start button and follow the prompts on the screen. You have to designate if your move is temporary or permanent, a start date (and end date if applicable), if you are moving or if an entire family is moving, both addresses and an e-mail address for confirmation.

Tip

Enter your forwarding information as early as possible to ensure you do not lose any old mail. You may also inform banks and credit card companies early to ensure no personal information is sent to the wrong address.

Things You'll Need

  • Internet connection
  • Old and new addresses
  • $1 to be paid by credit card or debit card
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About the Author

Eric Rosenberg is a financial professional from Denver. He has an Master of Business Administration in finance from the University of Denver and a bachelor's degree in finance from the University of Colorado, Boulder. Rosenberg has been writing online since 2006 at several blogs including Narrow Bridge Finance.