How to Fix an Aiwa CD Player

Written by hugh patterson
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How to Fix an Aiwa CD Player
Old CD players can often easily be repaired. (Comstock/Comstock/Getty Images)

Aiwa is known for its stereo equipment. The company produces well made components including a line of CD players. Because Aiwa components are well made, many stereo owners maintain their older Aiwa equipment rather than replace it. However, minor problems may develop over time that require repair. You can hire a professional repair technician to do the work but the labour cost is often greater than that of the CD player. Instead, you can use a few simple techniques to repair an Aiwa CD player rather than replace it.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • Phillips and standard screwdrivers
  • Plastic bag
  • Electrician's tape
  • Soldering iron
  • Cotton swabs
  • Rubbing alcohol
  • Compressed air

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Turn the CD player off and unplug the power cord. Aiwa CD players use a hard-wired power cord that must be unplugged from the electrical socket. Never work on an electronic device while it is either on or plugged into an outlet.

    How to Fix an Aiwa CD Player
    Always turn the power off and unplug the cord from the wall socket. (Jupiterimages/Polka Dot/Getty Images)
  2. 2

    Check the fuse. The fuse works in the same way as a circuit breaker, cutting the power off when there is an interruption that could damage the device. Aiwa CD players have a fuse on the device's back panel. Unscrew the fuse cap and pull the fuse out. Hold the fuse up to a light source and inspect the fuse's metal core. If the fuse is blown, the metal strip inside the fuse will be melted into two pieces. Do not replace the fuse until you find the initial problem.

    How to Fix an Aiwa CD Player
    Always check the fuse because it is the best indicator of a potential problem. (John Foxx/Stockbyte/Getty Images)
  3. 3

    Open the casing. Aiwa CD players have mounting screws on the side of the casing. Use a Phillips screwdriver to remove the screws. Place the screws in a plastic bag to prevent losing them.

  4. 4

    Examine the wiring. Because the wiring is surrounded by mechanical parts that move within the CD player's frame, a wire may be caught on one of these moving parts. Check the wiring for rips in the shielding and loose connections.

    How to Fix an Aiwa CD Player
    Look for any damage to the wiring which can cause a short. (Goodshoot/Goodshoot/Getty Images)
  5. 5

    Repair the damaged wiring. Carefully wrap a piece of electrician's tape around any bare wires, extending the tape ¼ inch on either side of the shielding. Solder any loose wires back to their connection points.

  6. 6

    Inspect the circuit board. Moisture can cause corrosion to form on the circuit board that causes electrical shorts. Use a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol to clean the corrosion off the board.

    How to Fix an Aiwa CD Player
    Look for corrosion and damage to the small circuit board inside the CD player. (Hemera Technologies/PhotoObjects.net/Getty Images)
  7. 7

    Clean the CD player with compressed air. The Aiwa CD player encapsulates a large amount of wiring and mechanical parts into a small area. Some parts are hard to reach. Use compressed air to blow out any dirt and debris from the CD player's interior.

  8. 8

    Tighten any loose mechanical parts. The Aiwa CD player uses plastic gears combined with metal tracks to move the CD's optical reader across the CD. Over time, these parts become loose. Use a Phillips screwdriver to tighten any loose parts.

  9. 9

    Clean the optical lens. Use a CD lens cleaner to clean the optical reader. Replace the cover and power the CD player up.

    How to Fix an Aiwa CD Player
    Clean the optical lens with a CD lens cleaner. (Thinkstock Images/Comstock/Getty Images)

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