How to Use Pigs to Clear Land

Written by kimberly sharpe Google
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How to Use Pigs to Clear Land
The pig's nose works as a natural rototiller. (pig image by Leonid Nyshko from Fotolia.com)

The pig has an amazing nose that works as a natural rototiller. The pig will eat grass and consume the roots, which completely clears the land. Pigs even eat large tree roots. While they are foraging, their fecal matter adds organic material to the soil. Three pigs can easily clear an entire field with their voracious eating and rooting habits. Once the ploughing and tilling of a field is complete, the pigs can be butchered to produce organic meat due to their all-natural diet from clearing the field. Allowing pigs to graze a field virtually eliminates the pigs' feed bill. Any pig breed will root and clear land with ease.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Things you need

  • Mobile pigsty
  • Electric fencing
  • Portable pig house
  • Tarps
  • Livestock water dispenser
  • Dried corn feed

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Place the pig in a mobile, movable pigsty to clear the land if the field is not fenced adequately to house a pig. Electric fence wire works well to keep pigs in a field. Pigs rarely try to escape in a large field where adequate food and rooting land is available.

  2. 2

    Provide shade for the pig if there are not trees in the fields where the pig will be working. Use portable houses constructed of wood or stretch tarps to offer the pig shade.

  3. 3

    Place adequate water within reach of the pig at all times. The pig requires abundant water during its work in the field.

  4. 4

    Sprinkle handfuls of dried corn feed around large roots that need removal. The corn will encourage the pig to begin rooting in the areas, and as it searches for the dried corn feed it will also eat the large roots.

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