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How to remove pit stains from a black shirt

Updated February 05, 2018

The first step in successfully removing underarm stains is to determine if the stain you're treating is a perspiration stain or a deodorant stain. On black clothing, perspiration stains will appear dark in colour and deodorant stains with appear white. Perspiration stains will also feel crunchy, whereas deodorant stains will feel greasy. Once you have determined what type of stain you are treating, follow a few simple steps to get rid of those embarrassing stains.

There are three methods of removing perspiration stains. For the first, apply liquid laundry detergent to the stain and let it sit for 30 minutes. Launder as usual, and air dry.

For the second method, mix one tablespoon white vinegar with one cup of water. Place the stained area in the solution and let it soak for an hour. Launder as usual, and air dry.

For the third method, make a paste of baking soda and water. Cover the stains in the paste and let it sit for 20 minutes. Launder as usual, and air dry.

There are also three methods of removing deodorant stains from clothing. For the first, apply liquid laundry detergent to the stain and let sit for 30 minutes. Launder as usual, and air dry.

For the second method, wet the stained areas, and pour salt on them. Use your fingers to rub the salt into the stains. Let the clothing sit for a few minutes. Launder the shirt with laundry detergent and a little salt added to the water. Allow the shirt to air dry.

For the third method, pour a small amount of ammonia on a cloth and blot the deodorant stains. Repeat until the white stains are no longer visible. Launder as usual, and air dry.

Tip

Do not dry your shirt in the dryer until you are certain the stains are completely gone, as the heat from the dryer will set the stains permanently.

Warning

When using ammonia, do so in a well-ventilated area.

Things You'll Need

  • Liquid laundry detergent
  • 1 tablespoon white vinegar
  • 1 cup water
  • Baking soda
  • Water
  • Salt
  • Ammonia
  • Cloth
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About the Author

Jess Jones has been a freelance writer since 2005. She has been a featured contributing writer for "Curve Magazine" and she teaches English composition at a small college in Ann Arbor, Michigan. She received her Master of Arts in English language and literature in 2002.