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How to write a personal trainer bio

Updated November 21, 2016

As a personal trainer, you may be asked to write a personal bio for a website, a company newsletter, gym membership pamphlets or other promotional materials. When drafting your bio, keep in mind for whom you are writing. Knowing who will likely read your bio should help you to determine what information to include. For example, if you are writing for a lay reader, leave out technical jargon that you would include in a health journal.

Decide how long your bio should be. Generally speaking, bios are shorter than biographies. A biography could span several pages and outline your journey into personal training and details of your education, certification and work history. A bio is generally no more than a paragraph, or about 100 words.

Introduce yourself to the reader. This can be as simple as mentioning your name and current employment. You may list some work history that has qualified you to be a professional personal trainer.

Mention any degrees or certification you have achieved. This adds to your credibility and helps the reader understand your credentials. If you have a particular focus as a personal trainer, such as women's fitness, triathlon training or swimming, indicate that.

Include any other information that you would like to share. For example, if you enjoy cooking, art or another hobby outside of personal training, you may want to include this information. This will make you seem more well-rounded and relatable to the reader.

Don't be afraid to market yourself by providing contact information. For instance, if you blog or produce newsletters on health and fitness, include this information. If you want people to be able to contact you for questions or rates, note your professional e-mail address. If you have been published in your field, include this information as well.

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About the Author

Liza Hollis has been writing for print and online publications since 2003. Her work has appeared on various digital properties, including USAToday.com. Hollis earned a degree in English Literature from the University of Florida.