How to record subliminal messages

Written by daniel dick
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How to record subliminal messages
Create a subliminal audio message with audio editing software. (small speaker image by timur1970 from

Subliminal messages are used often as a form of therapy or an advertising tool. Scientists disagree, however, whether subliminal messages are effective. Researchers who conducted a study on subliminal messages concluded there is a connection between subliminal messages and human behaviour, according to the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

A different study by Dr. Bahador Bahrami, a neuroscientist at University College London, found that subliminal messages are largely ignored by the brain if the person's focus is divided between the media through which the subliminal message is being played and another task.

Despite scientific disagreement on the subject, many people believe scrambled or distorted messages can be understood by the subconscious mind.

Therapists use the messages as a tool to break a patient's destructive habit or encourage a patient to abandon a persistent feeling. The messages discourage the habit or convince a person to feel differently. In advertising, subliminal messages reinforce the worth of a product or urge the audience to buy a product.

You can make your own subliminal messages at home using your computer and audio software. Instructions differ according to what audio software you use, but the principles are the same.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Things you need

  • Microphone
  • Audio software with the ability to play and record multiple tracks

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    How to record subliminal messages

  1. 1

    Choose the message you would like to make subliminal. All recordings need to be in the present tense. For instance, to stop a smoking habit, try a message like "I do not like smoking" or "Smoke makes me sick." To treat depression, try "I am a great person" or "I know I am happy." Advertising messages may be simple statements about the product like "Great value" or "Delicious."

  2. 2

    Record your subliminal message on one of the audio tracks using your audio software and a microphone.

  3. 3

    Decide what method you would like to use to make your message subliminal. Some subliminal messages are inserted into the music backward. This method garbles the message's meaning. The mind subconsciously hears the message as if it was played forward. To implant the message this way, choose the play backward or the play in reverse option on your audio software.

    Another option is to change the frequency of the message to a range that is difficult to hear consciously. Use your audio software to change the frequency of your message to about 16.5 kilohertz. This level is within the hearing range, but too high to be understood. Bury the message under a loud noise on a music track or other audio track.

  4. 4

    Choose a piece of music or other audio track and play it on one of the other tracks on your multitrack audio software. Play the two tracks at the same time and listen to how they synchronise. If you have set the message at 16.5 kilohertz, you should hear nothing except the music track. If you are using a backward or buried recording, change the time the message is played to synchronise with a loud or complicated part in the normal recording. Your message will be hidden in the track, but should be recognised by the subconscious mind.

  5. 5

    Loop your message throughout the recording. Repetition is important when making a subliminal recording. Bury the sounds if you are not going to change the message to a higher frequency.

  6. 6

    Play both tracks together and press the record button on your software program. When the tracks finish, press stop. Both tracks are recorded together. Play your subliminal message from your computer or burn it onto a CD using a CD-burning program.

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