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How to siphon with a garden hose

Siphoning through a water hose allows you to drain a source of liquids through the basics of gravity. Gravity pushes the water through the hose, and it allows you to drain a location without having to siphon the water by sucking on the end of the hose, according to online resource Build Eazy. Siphoning makes it less of a challenge to drain water from an area, such as an above-ground pool, because you will not have to put forth any extra labour, and your can direct the water wherever you like.

Select the location for siphoning. The drainage area needs to be lower than the siphon source. For example, you might siphon an above-ground swimming pool into a sewer drain.

Clamp one end of the garden hose closed.

Secure the other end of the hose to a faucet source.

Turn on the water flow from the faucet to fill the hose. Filling your garden hose with water will provide the pressure that you will need for the siphoning.

Turn the faucet off once the water hose is full.

Place a clamp on the other end of the hose. Remove the hose from the faucet.

Place one of the clamped ends into the source that you wish to siphon. The end of the hose needs to be underwater.

Place the other end in your drainage area.

Remove the clamp from the hose that you placed in the water source. Check to ensure that it remains underwater.

Remove the clamp from the other end of the hose. It will begin siphoning into the drainage area

Push the hose that remains in the siphoning location down to ensure that it keeps siphoning. As the siphoning source becomes low, you will need to ensure that the hose remains underwater.

Things You'll Need

  • Water hose
  • Clamps
  • Faucet
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About the Author

Angela LaFollette holds a Bachelor of Arts in advertising with a minor in political science from Marshall University. LaFollette found her passion for writing during an internship as a reporter for "The West Virginia Standard" in 2007. She has more than six years of writing experience and specializes in topics in garden and pets.