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How to remove old blood stains from a mattress

Blood stains on a mattress can become permanent if you do not clean them soon after they happen. Mattress covers do not always protect completely, and sometimes stains seep through. The older the blood stain is, the more difficult it is to completely remove. Use common household items to remove blood stains from a mattress as soon as you notice them.

Wear rubber gloves to protect yourself from possible infections in the blood. Clean fresh blood on a mattress with paper towels. Blot the blood stain instead of rubbing it. Press lightly on the paper towels to absorb the blood.

Fill a spray bottle with water. Add 36 ml (2 tbsp) of white vinegar, and shake the bottle to mix the solution.

Spray the vinegar solution onto the blood stain until it is covered. Blot the stain area with more paper towels to absorb the blood that seeped into the mattress. Continue to spray and blot the area until no more blood comes up using this method.

Apply 2 to 3 drops of liquid dish soap to the stain. Use a scrub brush to work the soap into the area, and then blot the stain with paper towels. Fill the spray bottle with water and spray the stain to rinse it off. Continue to apply the soap, blot the area and rinse it off. If the stain still appears, remove it with hydrogen peroxide.

Apply hydrogen peroxide to the blood stain with a cotton pad. Allow it to foam, and then blot the area with paper towels. Rinse the blood stain by spraying it with water, and continue to apply hydrogen peroxide to bring the blood out of the mattress.

Things You'll Need

  • Rubber gloves
  • Paper towels
  • Spray bottle
  • Water
  • 36 ml (2 tbsp) white vinegar
  • Liquid dish soap
  • Scrub brush
  • Hydrogen peroxide
  • Cotton pad
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About the Author

Angela LaFollette holds a Bachelor of Arts in advertising with a minor in political science from Marshall University. LaFollette found her passion for writing during an internship as a reporter for "The West Virginia Standard" in 2007. She has more than six years of writing experience and specializes in topics in garden and pets.