How to Repair a Tear in a Nylon Jacket

Written by lanh ma
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How to Repair a Tear in a Nylon Jacket
An iron will help flatten the nylon patch to the jacket. (iron image by Eray Haciosmanoglu from Fotolia.com)

Nylon is a strong, light fabric that is smooth and non-absorbent. It dries quickly and is resistant to staining, making it an ideal choice for jackets. If your nylon jacket has become torn, patching the tear is a straightforward process. Being aware of how to repair tears in a nylon jacket can allow you to wear the jacket for years to come.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • Needle
  • Thread
  • Seam sealant
  • Nylon patch
  • T-shirt
  • Iron
  • Ironing board.
  • Coat hanger

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Sew the tear closed with the needle and thread. It does not have to be a tidy seam, but the edges of the tear should meet and lie flat.

  2. 2

    Cut a nylon patch that is the same shape as the tear and slightly larger. Both the nylon patch and the seam sealant can be purchased as a kit designed for nylon repair

  3. 3

    Squeeze a thin layer of seam sealant over the stitching and onto one side of the nylon patch. Cover the entire surface of the patch.

  4. 4

    Set the jacket and the patch aside to allow the sealant to cure. The amount of time necessary for curing the sealant is indicated on the sealant itself.

  5. 5

    Press the patch to the stitched tear, covering it entirely. The sealant will form a bond that holds the patch to the jacket.

  6. 6

    Lay the jacket on an ironing board, and spread a T-shirt over the tear.

  7. 7

    Set the iron to a low heat and use it to press the patch into the jacket. This will help bond the patch to the jacket permanently while flattening the patch.

  8. 8

    Hang the jacket up on a coat hanger. This will allow the patch to cool and dry before you wear it.

Tips and warnings

  • Do not allow the iron to heat the nylon too much, as it can cause the fabric to melt.

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