How to Get Rid of a Seed Corn

Written by robert preston
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How to Get Rid of a Seed Corn
Shoes like high heels can lead to corns. (foot image by stensondl from Fotolia.com)

Seed corns are a painful skin condition which results in hard calluses on the surface of feet, caused by constant rubbing and pressing on the foot, often by the shoes of the individual suffering from the corns. While severe cases of seed corns may eventually require surgical attention, many seed corns can be cured by the individual adjusting their footwear habits to reduce areas of irritation which cause or exacerbate seed corns.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Things you need

  • Comfortable shoes
  • Foot bath
  • Pummice stone
  • Toe separators
  • Corn pads

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Wear comfortable shoes. The rubbing and compression caused by tight shoes, particularly shoes with pointed toes, can lead to corns.

  2. 2

    Soak your feet in a foot bath for a half-hour to an hour, then use a pumice stone to gently file away dead skin from the corn. Soaking the feet will allow the skin to soften, making it easier to use the stone without pain.

  3. 3

    Use a toe separator to treat corns on the toes. The separator is a small piece of foam which fits between the toes, holding them apart so that they do not rub against rash other. Separators may not work with shoes that are too narrow in the toe.

  4. 4

    Use non-medicated corn pads to treat corns on the soles, sides or top of the feet. The pads place a thin pad of foam around the irritated skin, preventing your shoes and socks from rubbing against the corn causing further irritation. Medicated pads will also prevent rubbing, however the chemicals used as a treatment can be irritating in their own right.

  5. 5

    Speak with a doctor if the above methods are unsuccessful in removing the seed corns. Corns which can not be cured through proper care may require surgical removal.

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