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How to get wrinkles out of nylon

Updated February 21, 2017

Nylon is not an easy or forgiving fabric to work with. Because it is synthetic, it cannot withstand high heat from a clothing dryer on a standard setting or from an iron. Carelessly laundering your nylon garment can cause it to melt or shrink from the heat. You can get the wrinkles out of a nylon garment, but you'll need several hours to perform this safely. If you plan on wearing nylon to a special event, check your garment ahead of time or get it dry cleaned to avoid accidental damage.

Wet your wrinkled nylon garment thoroughly in lukewarm water. Wring out excess water.

Place wet nylon garment in the dryer. Turn the dryer to permanent press, which prevents wrinkles from forming during the drying process. Check on the garment every 10 minutes and remove when it is almost dry, perhaps a little damp.

Remove the nylon garment from the dryer and place it on a garment hanger. Hang this in a dry spot. Any wrinkles in the nylon garment will naturally fall out over the course of a couple hours.

Turn iron on the lowest setting if you are pressed for time and need to iron your nylon garment. Set up an ironing board. Place the nylon garment on the ironing board.

Iron the nylon garment, working quickly. Do not linger over wrinkled areas since nylon can melt or develop garment holes when exposed to heat.

Run the iron over the nylon garment, moving the garment as needed, until the wrinkles have been reduced or eliminated. Using an iron is not recommended due to the high likelihood of garment damage; however, if you don't have time to re-wet and dry the garment, you can attempt to iron your nylon clothing.

Things You'll Need

  • Water
  • Clothes dryer
  • Clothes hanger
  • Iron (optional)
  • Ironing board (optional)
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