How to paint letters on glass

Written by v. l. hamlin
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How to paint letters on glass
Personalise drinking glasses with a monogram or your whole name. (Wine glass down on a glass table image by inacio pires from Fotolia.com)

Painting with stencils is an easy way to add design to an otherwise plain glass. A quick stop at your local dollar store or a flea market will provide you with more glassware than you could ever want to paint for only a small amount of money. Be creative while painting; design a monogram on your drinking glasses or personalise a glass cake dish with your last name or a silly quote.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • Glassware such as a drinking glass or plate
  • Rubbing alcohol
  • Washcloth/rag
  • Flexible alphabet stencils
  • Re-positionable tape
  • Glass paint
  • Paintbrushes
  • Clear gloss enamel paint

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Dampen a washcloth or a rag with rubbing alcohol and wipe down the glass to remove any residue or dust.

  2. 2

    Place a few small pieces of re-positionable tape on the back of the alphabet stencil. Position the stencil onto the glass, wherever you want to paint the letters. Use regular alphabet letters or stencils with pre-written words.

  3. 3

    Dip a paintbrush in to glass paint and cover the stencilled area with paint. Make an outline in one colour, allow it to dry and paint the centre with another colour, if you like.

  4. 4

    Use a clean paintbrush to paint a thin layer of clear gloss enamel paint over the painted area. Allow the gloss to become tacky, then add an additional layer to protect the paint.

  5. 5

    Allow the paint to dry overnight or bake the glass to cure the paint as directed on the packaging.

Tips and warnings

  • Add decorative accents to monograms or personalisation with smaller-shaped stencils.

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