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How to Write a Letter Giving a Landlord 1 Month Notice

Updated March 23, 2017

Moving requires getting all of your ducks in a row: you have to pack, switch over the utility bills, as well as getting the security deposit back. But before you can do any of the preparations you have to first give your landlord the proper amount of notice as dictated in the lease. Most rentals are satisfied with one month's notice.

Find your lease and read it thoroughly, preferably well before your 30 days are up. Not only does this ensure that 30 days notice is sufficient, but it gives you time to get any information you may need for the letter.

Write the name of the landlord and/or rental agency, along with their address, at the top of the letter. This should be listed on the lease. Some rentals have a property manager as well as an oversight agency. If that's the case, both should be listed on the notice.

Keep the note short and to the point. After the greeting, state that you are planning to leave the property. Include the day you intend to leave and write down that you understand this satisfies the terms of your lease that dictates a 30-day notice.

Provide your contact information, such as an e-mail address, cell phone number and work contact as well as a forwarding address where they can send your deposit.

Sign the letter and make a copy before mailing the original to the landlord or rental agency with at least one business day to spare before the 30-day mark. If you want to make sure that the landlord receives the note, take it to the rental office yourself, or send it certified mail so you have a receipt of its arrival.

Put your copy of the note in a safe place for future reference.

Tip

The letter can be handwritten or typed. The form of the content is not as important as what the letter contains.

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About the Author

Nikki Jardin began freelance writing in 2009 and focuses on food and travel articles. She has been a professional cook and caterer for more than 20 years. She holds a degree in environmental science from Humboldt State University.