How to rent with a discharged bankruptcy

Written by valencia higuera
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How to rent with a discharged bankruptcy
Rent after a Bankrutpcy (apartment for rent image by dead_account from Fotolia.com)

A bankruptcy discharge erases your past debts and presents the opportunity to start over. Still, some creditors and landlords are leery to work with people who have a bankruptcy on their record, which can make renting or buying a home difficult. If looking to rent a property, there are ways to make a good impression and get the property. Consider methods to improve your chances of finding a rental after a discharge.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Things you need

  • Security deposit
  • References

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Maintain stable income and employment history. Expect your landlord to check with your employer for a reference. Don't bounce from job-to-job. Stay with the same employer for at least six months, and be prepared to show income statements or tax returns.

  2. 2

    Disclose your personal information. Briefly mention your recent discharge to see if it'll affect your ability to qualify for the property. Be honest and upfront to gain the landlord's trust.

  3. 3

    Impress the landlord. Consider business casual attire when meeting with potential landlords. Speak professionally, no slang. Offer a handshake. Maintain good eye contact.

  4. 4

    Negotiate the security deposit and rent. Persuade a landlord by offering to pay a higher security deposit or higher monthly rent to compensate for your bad credit history.

  5. 5

    Present your rental history. Prior to meeting with potential landlords, contact your previous landlords and ask them to write a professional reference in your behalf. Ask for references only if you've always paid your rent on time.

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