How to paint on rubber boots

Written by mallory ferland
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How to paint on rubber boots
Painting your own boots will ensure that you own a one-of-a-kind pair. (wellington boots image by BasPhoto from

With so many colourful patterns and solid varieties of rubber boots on the market, painting a pair of old or even a newly purchased pair may seem odd. However, painting your own rain boots allows you to achieve a colour that perhaps is not available at a cheaper price. Painting anything is an expression of art, and for those who love to design and create, a rubber boot is just another blank canvas.

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  1. 1

    Cover the painting area with tarps, scratch linen, newspaper or any other cover that can be ruined in order to protect the floor or table beneath it. It is best to paint outdoors if possible as spray paint fumes are toxic, unpleasant and can give you a headache if you are trapped in a small room with them. If not outdoors, set up in a work shed, studio, garage or spacious room with wide open doors and windows.

  2. 2

    Clean any dirt, stain or grim from the rubber boots. It is best to begin with new, never-been-warn boots; however, you can use old boots if you wash them well with soapy water and allow them to dry completely. When dry, place standing up on the protective tarp.

  3. 3

    Apply tape for making patterns or borders if you do not wish to paint the entire boot in one colour. Block off sections to allow the base colour to show through in a pattern, stencil or edge trim. Cut strips of blue painters tape into the shapes and sizes of your choice (such as dots, stars or stripes) and press securely onto the boot.

  4. 4

    Spay the initial coat of rubber-based spray paint in one thin, even layer. Krylon is an effective, rubber-based paint. Not every type of spray paint will work. Read the can carefully before buying to make sure rubber is listed as one of the possible application surfaces.

  5. 5

    Allow the first coat to dry for two to three hours. Apply a very thin coat each time to avoid dripping paint. Lighter paint shades made take four or five coats to complete while darker shade may only require two or three. Allow each coat to dry completely before you apply the next. Using different colours in various spots at each coat level will create a gradient effect.

  6. 6

    Move the boots to a dry location where they can finish drying overnight. Allow at least 12 hours after spraying the final coat before you remove any tape stencils or borders and wear the boots. If they are sticky or tacky at all, they are not yet dry.

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