How to Write an Introduction for a Science Fair Project

Updated March 23, 2017

The introduction to a science fair project is one of the most important pieces of the project. It tells the judges what the report is about, the reason that you conduct the work that you did and what you thought was going to happen during your experiment. Additionally it is the first impression you give the judges and a poorly constructed introduction can give them a bad impression of your whole project. Take time to perfect the introduction for your science fair project.

Write down the reason that you decided to complete the project. This is best stated as a question in response to situation that you were in.

Determine the information that you want to find out and write it down in one or two sentences. A strong concise statement works better than a lengthy explanation in your introduction.

Describe the experiment you plan to do as part of your science project. This will be explained in greater detail later in your report, so just use one or two sentences to summarise the basic experiment.

State the expected results of the experiment. This is your hypothesis, and it is one of the most important parts of your science project. It is OK if your results are different from your expectations. Many students adjust the expectations after the results but you should not.

Proofread your introduction to make sure that it is clear and grammatically correct. Reading it aloud and having a friend look at it can help in the process.


The introduction gives the judges the first impression, but the rest of the report is just as important, be sure to include your raw data results, as well as graphs measuring your findings. Pictures of the experiment being completed can also be included in the final report. When you set up the display for your project one section should be focused on the same materials in your introduction. One part should focus on the experiment both the process and results. The third section should focus on the conclusion or what you learnt from completing your project.

Things You'll Need

  • Paper
  • Pen
  • Computer
  • Printer
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About the Author

Miriam C has been writing since 2007. She earned her bachelor's degree in English from Brigham Young University. Among her many jobs, Miriam C has taught middle-school students. She's written for and other clients on finances, family and education.