How to Remove a SIM Card From a Nokia 6021

Updated February 21, 2017

The Nokia 6021 is a tri-band Global Systems for Mobile Communications (GSM) phone that used the international 900MHz and 1800MHz frequencies and 1900MHz for United States based GSM networks. It has a 65,000-color display and is capable of 2G speed data communication. It supports USB connection for computer data transfer and is Bluetooth capable. It supports up to three hours of talk time with up to 320 hours of standby time. Although no longer manufactured, the Nokia 6021 is still available on the second hand market and is a very capable international phone for GSM networks.

Turn your phone off by pressing the power switch on the top of the phone for several seconds. If you press the switch only briefly, it will bring up a list of caller profiles. If this happens, one of the profiles options is to turn the phone off. Select power off and press the centre selection key on the keypad.

Press the cover release button on the bottom of the back cover.

Slide the cover down to remove it from the phone.

Remove the battery by lifting it up from the bottom of the phone.

Slide the SIM card, the small card under the battery at the bottom of the phone, up to remove it from the phone.

Slip the battery back into the phone.

Replace the back cover. Do not turn the phone on, without a SIM card, the phone will not work. Putting the battery and cover back in the phone is simply a good way to keep all parts of the phone in one place.


If you are not going to use the phone for a very long time, remove the battery and keep the phone, charger and battery in a zipper bag to keep all components together.


The phone will not work without a SIM card. If you want to use the phone, insert a working SIM card associated with an activated account.

Things You'll Need

  • Zipper bag (optional)
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About the Author

Although he grew up in Latin America, Mr. Ma is a writer based in Denver. He has been writing since 1987 and has written for NPR, AP, Boeing, Ford New Holland, Microsoft, RAHCO International, Umax Data Systems and other manufacturers in Taiwan. He studied creative writing at Mankato State University in Minnesota. He speaks fluent Mandarin Chinese, English and reads Spanish.