How to address mail to a county court judge

Written by mike broemmel
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How to address mail to a county court judge
Writing a letter to a county court judge. (writing image by Horticulture from

Sending a letter to a county court judge requires the use of certain established protocols. Depending on the circumstances, there also may be legal requirements associated with the manner in which you communicate with the judge. When corresponding with the court, you should demonstrate proper respect and not engage in any type of legally impermissible communication.

Skill level:

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Things you need

  • Letter addressed to the judge
  • Companion envelope addressed to the judge

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  1. 1

    Address the letter appropriately. The proper manner to address a letter to a county court judge is:

    The Honorable Susan Doe Judge County Court of Waterfall County Any City, Any State 00000

  2. 2

    Use the proper salutation at the start of your letter:

    Dear Judge Doe:

  3. 3

    Make an appropriate reference to the opposing party in a "cc" at the bottom of the letter:

    cc: Jame Roe, attorney at law

  4. 4

    Refer to the judge as "Your Honor" or as "Judge Doe" as appropriate throughout the letter. Do not use "Ms. Doe" and certainly not "Susan" within the correspondence.

Tips and warnings

  • Keep your letter as concise as possible. The typical county court judge maintains a very full schedule. She does not have time to wade through unnecessarily lengthy correspondence.
  • If you have a case pending before the judge, you absolutely must copy your letter in its entirety to the opposing party or his attorney. In most cases, the proper method of communicating with a judge when a case is pending is by filing a formal motion with the court. There are some limited instances in which a letter is acceptable. For example, if the court requests a letter from both parties regarding scheduling issues, a motion is not necessary. However, letters to the judge while a case is pending must be used sparingly.

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