How to Make a No-Sew Fleece Poncho

A no-sew fleece poncho keeps a child or adult warm on a cool day. Because the project doesn't require sewing skills and fleece can be purchased inexpensively especially during sales or in the off season, no-sew ponchos make a cheap and easy gift for a woman or little girl. Make several ponchos in one afternoon for a youth group or to sell in a craft bazaar.

Cut the fleece until it is a square, with all sides the size of the fleece the same width--58 to 60 inches for an adult poncho, or 30 inches for a child's poncho. Trim the selvedge edge away.

Fold the fleece square diagonally. Mark the centre of the folded edge.

Measure and mark 3 inches on each side of your centre mark on the folded edge.

Cut a vertical line about 3 inches long on each of the two side marks. Cut a horizontal line to connect those two vertical lines and create a hole for the head. Try the poncho on and cut more around the hole if necessary to fit over the head.

Finish the bottom edge as desired. Because fleece won't fray or ravel, you don't need to hem it. You can cut fringe all the way around, making vertical cuts around the perimeter about 1 inch wide or use fabric glue to affix embellishments such as sequinned trim or rhinestones.


Create a poncho for an 18-inch doll using a 20-inch square of fleece. Start with a 4-inch-square head hole and cut it wider as needed to fit over the doll's head.


Do not use any iron-on trims or embellishments on fleece. The heat from the iron can burn or melt the fleece.

Things You'll Need

  • 2 yards polyester fleece, 58 to 60 inches wide (1 yard for a child's poncho)
  • Scissors
  • Measuring tape
  • Washable fabric pen
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About the Author

Andrea Lott Haney writes articles and training materials for food industry publications. Having studied foodservice sanitation, nutrition and menu planning at Purdue University, Lott Haney has more than 10 years of experience as a catering and event planner for luxury hotels and currently tours the Midwest as a corporate customer service trainer and consultant.