How to Buy Damaged & Repairable Cars

Written by contributing writer
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Because purchasing a new vehicle can be considerable expense, consumers are looking at all their options when buying a car, truck, or van. Many times, buyers invest in pre-owned vehicles at considerable savings over newer models. If you have a knack for automotive repair, you can purchase damaged or wrecked vehicles and make the necessary repairs to bring them back to like-new condition. Some people specialise in purchasing wrecked and damaged vehicles with the purpose of repairing and reselling the vehicle for a profit.

Skill level:
Moderately Challenging

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Things you need

  • Phone book
  • Internet
  • Newspaper

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Locate vehicle auction sites in your area. Auction companies such as ADESA (vehicle remarketing agency) and Salvage Direct (insurance auction representatives) are listed in phone books and online.

  2. 2

    Inspect the vehicles at the auction and determine which vehicles meet your predetermined needs. It's a good idea to bring a mechanic with you for added insight.

  3. 3

    Attend an auction and bid on the vehicle you are interested in. Be prepared to arrange towing, because many auction officials require removal of your vehicle at auction's end.

  4. 4

    Internet auction sites such as eBay and Craigslist offer repairable vehicles and damaged and parts vehicles.

  5. 5

    Refer to your local newspaper. Many damaged and repairable vehicles are listed for sale in the classified section.

Tips and warnings

  • In most instances, you will want to avoid flood-damaged vehicles, as they frequently have many wiring issues.
  • Look for signs of water under seats and carpet, and look for rust on the underside of the dash. Be aware of musty odours or an attempt to cover them up.

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