How to pay for colostomy surgery

Written by ts jordan
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According to the medical website Medline Plus, a colostomy is a surgical procedure designed to circumvent the role of the colon in the digestive process. After a colostomy, your large intestine will be linked to a man made hole in the abdominal wall, through which waste will pass into a disposable bag. While the cost of a colostomy can vary depending on location and treatment facility, no surgical procedure is cheap. Paying for a colostomy can be a challenging feat.

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Contact your insurance company to receive an updated copy of your policy and benefits to determine how much you will have to cover out-of-pocket. Set up an appointment with an attorney or accountant if you require help making the necessary calculations.

  2. 2

    Make an appointment with the hospital billing director or other individual in charge of accounts receivable to discuss the possibility of setting up a payment plan. A payment plan can help to make a difficult-to-afford surgery manageable, helping to spread the cost out over a prolonged period to fit into almost any budget.

  3. 3

    Perform research to determine whether you would be eligible for Medicare, or another state or privately sponsored medical insurance program. Individuals are generally eligible for Medicare if they are over the age of 65, or under the age of 65, disabled, and have been receiving social security benefits for at least 24 months. Consult with the hospital billing department and they should be able to advise you on whether you are eligible for a special aid program.

  4. 4

    Consider taking out a private loan using your home or other assets as collateral. While not the most attractive option, it can help you get needed surgery where you are otherwise unable.

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