How to Prepare for a Rugby Match

Written by george lawrence
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How to Prepare for a Rugby Match
Rugby is intense and physical. (rugby image by Alison Bowden from Fotolia.com)

Rugby games last 80 minutes and the physical and mental energy required to sustain yourself over the course of a rugby match is intense. Without preparation, you will not perform at your peak. Prior to your next rugby match, spend some time preparing your mind and your body. Rest and eat well, think about the match and your opponent. If you put in the preparation, your game will improve.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Get all of your equipment in order the night before the game. While mundane, this will prevent you from stressing out on your way to the game and you will avoid forgetting something important. Pack your equipment, water bottles, protein snack bars or other pregame food, a first aid kit, your cell phone, and some money. Once packed, put that element of game preparation out of your mind.

  2. 2

    Meditate about your own feelings and anxieties over the match. Build yourself up mentally and work out goals or strategies to minimise your down falls. In addition to this mental routine, think about your opponent's strengths and weaknesses. Develop strategies to exploit the opponent's weaknesses.

  3. 3

    Eat a light, high-energy meal on the day of the match. Pastas and foods high in protein are good choices. Spend the day of the match in a relaxed state; often, rugby players are nervous and anxious for the game to start. Stay focused and relaxed. Take a light nap a few hours prior to the game.

  4. 4

    Meet with your team about an hour before the game to practice drills and strategies. Perform warm-up exercises such as laps or light weightlifting. Speak about the overall strategy and discuss the opponent.

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