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How To Sign Happy Birthday in Sign Language

Updated April 17, 2017

Today is the day you will learn how to sign happy birthday in American Sign Language in three different ways. Whether you share your newly found knowledge with a hearing or non-hearing person, it will surprise her and set your birthday wish above the many text messages and cards she will receive because you made an extra effort to learn something in her honour for her special day.

Hit your chest gently with both open hands. Your fingers should all be touching and your thumbs standing straight out.

Pull your hands toward your face as soon as they touch your chest, lift them and circle back to hit your chest again. Your hands should only go toward your face for a half second.

Cross your right hand over your chest toward your left shoulder and circle it in an upward motion twice.

Circle the centre of your chest with your right hand in an upward motion two times.

Raise your open right hand in front of your mouth and pull it down until it is in front of your chest.

Touch your chest with the middle finger on your right hand. It is a quick motion that takes one to two seconds to make.

Hit your chest gently with both open hands. Your fingers should all be touching and your thumb standing straight out. Pull your hands toward your face as soon as they touch your chest, lift them and circle back to hit your chest again. Your hands should only go toward your face for a half second.

Put your left hand in front of your stomach. Your palm should be turned up

Put your right hand on your stomach, pull it away from your body then place it on the left hand.

Point your left arm and index finger toward the right side of your body. Place your right elbow on top of your left index finger.

Curl your right hand fingers, except your index, so your middle finger is touching your thumb; your ring and pinky should be in the circle as well. Point your right index finger to the sky. This is ASL for the letter "d."

Lower your right hand until it touches your left elbow. It is like the sun setting.

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About the Author

Stacy D. Cooper received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Indiana University with an emphasis in writing and literature. She is fascinated with books, reads constantly and is the owner and publisher of a book review blog and website. She currently writes for online content providers while raising her two daughters.