How to plant gladiolus in pots

Written by jonae fredericks Google
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How to plant gladiolus in pots
Gladioli grow from corms, which are similar to bulbs. (the gladiolus bulbs image by Igor Groshev from

Also known as sword lilies, gladioli produce large, showy flowers that come in a variety of colours. Suitable for both ground and container planting, gladioli grow from corms that are similar to bulbs except for the bud that protrudes from the top. If you do not have the space for an outdoor garden, you can plant gladiolus corms directly into pots, which you can display on your patio or terrace throughout the spring and summer.

Skill level:

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Things you need

  • 30 to 40 cm (12 to 16 inch) containers
  • Potting soil
  • Play sand
  • Gladiolus corms

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  1. 1

    Fill the containers, with a damp mixture of 50 per cent potting soil and 50 per cent play sand, in the early fall. Fill the container 3/4 full with the soil and sand mixture. Make sure that the containers have drainage holes in the bottom.

  2. 2

    Dig holes in the soil mixture for the gladiolus corms. Dig the holes 15 cm (6 inches) deep and 15 cm (6 inches) apart. Place the corms in the holes with the flat side down, bud side up.

  3. 3

    Place the containers in a spare refrigerator, basement or root cellar. The storage area should have a constant temperature of approximately 7.22 degrees C (45 degrees F). Light is not a necessity during this dormancy period.

  4. 4

    Bring the pots outdoors in the spring when the gladiolus shoots begin to pop up through the soil. Place the pots in a warm, sunny area.

  5. 5

    Water the gladioli by soaking the soil with a watering bucket. Provide enough water that it seeps through the soil and out the drainage holes. Keep the soil moist at all times, watering whenever necessary.

  6. 6

    Allow the gladioli to die back in the fall. Wait for the leaves to turn yellow and cut the foliage down the soil line. Dig up the corms and fill the pots with a new batch of potting mix to repeat the dormancy process.

Tips and warnings

  • Do not cut your gladioli down before they die back and turn yellow. The dying back process is important to the growth of the corm the following year. During the dying back process, the corm gathers energy from the sun, through the leaves. Cutting off the leaves before the process is through may affect the new spring blooming process.

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