DISCOVER
×

How to Generate a Conversion Calculator for Meters Per Second Into Excel

Updated April 17, 2017

Microsoft Excel is an excellent spreadsheet application that has a large number of built-in mathematical and data functions that can be used to program tables and conversion calculators. Entering functions into an Excel spreadsheet can be performed manually or with the function wizard, which helps you format the function properly. If you need to convert different rates of speed into meters per second, you can set up a series of functions in Excel to make the calculations automatically.

Create a new spreadsheet in Excel.

Create labels for your conversion calculator. Type "mph" into cell "A1." Type "km/h" into cell "A2." Type "m/s" into cells "C1" and "C2."

Select cell "D1" and press the "Fx" button next to the "Formula bar." Search for the "PRODUCT" function under the "Math and Trig" list of functions. Highlight "PRODUCT" and press "OK."

Type "B1" into the "Number 1" text box. Type "1.609344" into the "Number 2" box and click "OK;" this number is the miles per hour to meters per second conversion factor. Cell D1 will convert any number entered in cell B1 from miles per hour into meters per second.

Select cell "D2" and press the "Fx" button. Highlight the "PRODUCT" function and press "OK."

Type "B2" into the "Number 1" text box. Type "0.277777778" into the "Number 2" box and click "OK;" this number is the kilometres per hour to meters per second conversion factor. Cell D2 will convert any number entered in cell B2 from kilometres per hour into meters per second.

Save your spreadsheet.

Tip

If you need to convert less common rates of speed such as feet per minute or centimetres per hour, use a search engine to find the conversion factor, then create an entry in your calculator by multiplying the rate of speed by the conversion factor.

Things You'll Need

  • Microsoft Excel
Cite this Article A tool to create a citation to reference this article Cite this Article

About the Author

William Nagel is a graduate of the Georgia Institute of Technology, where he studied science, technology and culture. He has been writing since 2007 and specializes in computer hardware, operating systems and software documentation. His work has been published in the "North Avenue Review."