How to Repair a Leaning Fence

Written by david brown
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How to Repair a Leaning Fence
(fence image by TheThirdMan from Fotolia.com)

Good fences may make for good neighbours, but a fence that leans isn't going to make anyone happy. If that fence is otherwise sound, with a little effort and a little help, you can soon have it standing up straight. With a few common hand tools and help from a friend or neighbour, your fence will be as good as new.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Things you need

  • Shovel
  • Level
  • Sledge hammer
  • Wooden stakes, 2 to 3 feet long
  • Framing lumber, 2-by-4, 8 feet long
  • Deck screws, 3 inch
  • Electric screwdriver
  • Wheelbarrow
  • Concrete mix and water

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Dig around each fence post in the leaning section of the fence. You don't need to dig all the way to the base of the post, but dig far enough that you can easily push the post upright.

  2. 2

    Use the sledge hammer to drive a stake into the ground. The stakes should be about six feet from each fence post and in a line perpendicular to the fence, leaving one foot of the stake above ground.

  3. 3

    Hold the level against the fence post and push the post level. Have your helper hold the post level, while you place a 2-by-4 diagonally from the stake in the ground to a point near the top of the post.

  4. 4

    Screw the 2-by-4 in place using deck screws and the electric screwdriver. This will hold the post in place as you complete your work.

  5. 5

    Mix concrete according to the instructions on the bag. Pour the mixed concrete into the excavation you've made around each post.

  6. 6

    Let the concrete cure for at least 24 hours, and then remove the 2-by-4s and stakes.

Tips and warnings

  • Pull a string line from the first fence post to the last to serve as a guide for righting the posts.
  • If the fence is wracked--leaning in a direction parallel to the fence line--you'll need to brace the fence posts in that direction as well.
  • Call 811 within the United States for a free utility location service before you dig.

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