How to Replace a SIM Card on a Samsung Phone

Samsung is one of the leading manufacturers of cellphones. Some of these phones are unlocked, and others are programmed to work on specific networks. Each phone comes with a SIM card, which holds data and account information. These SIM cards may become lost or stolen, or you may want to simply change your provider. In either case, you can replace your SIM card.

Call your wireless provider and ask them for a replacement SIM card. This replacement will be mailed to you. If you don't want the same phone number, you can purchase a SIM card from a phone or electronic store, or online. Charge your phone fully.

Open the battery compartment to your phone and remove the battery. Next, remove the SIM card. This is the small white card in the back of the phone. It will be in a SIM card slot. If you've lost your SIM card, wait for the new one to arrive.

Remove the SIM card from the card it's being housed in. Write the IME number printed on the underside of the battery and the numbers printed on the SIM card. You will need this information when registering the new SIM card online. You can register the SIM card on the Internet, online or in person.

Insert the SIM card into the slot. Turn on the phone and the name of your provider should show up.

Remove the previous SIM card from your Samsung phone.

Remove the SIM card from the card it's housed in.

Insert the replacement SIM card into the SIM card slot. You will not have to register your postpay SIM card, your account details are already programmed into the card.


If your Samsung phone carries the name or emblem of a specific network provider, you can only replace the SIM card with one that carries these name or emblem.


Your phone company may replace your SIM card free of charge, but be aware that in some cases you may have to pay a fee for this service.

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About the Author

April Khan is a medical journalist who began writing in 2005. She has contributed to publications such as "BBC Focus." In 2012, Khan received her Doctor of Public Health from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. She also holds an Associate of Arts from the Art Institute of Dallas and a Master of Science in international health from University College London.