How to Use a Dial Height Gauge

Written by kevin krause
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When you need to know the height of an object with an extreme degree of accuracy, fine-tuned height gauges are your best bet. While there are newer height gauges with digital readouts, traditional dial height gauges work to within the same range of accuracy. Learning how to set up your gauge properly to conduct measurements will insure that your measurements fall within a small range of error, sometimes even as low as .001" for height gauges 12 inches and under. (See Reference 2.)

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • Dial height gauge

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Clean the working surface and height gauge of any debris or dust to insure accurate readings. Be sure to clean and wipe dry the surface of the measuring jaw, the gauge ruler and the object to be measured.

  2. 2

    Place the height gauge on a flat and even surface. Loosen the screw holding the measuring jaw in place. Check to make sure the measuring gauge moves smoothie and freely and that the dial is reading accurately.

  3. 3

    Lift the jaw of the height gauge so that it will clear the top of the object to be measured and place the object underneath the jaw. Make sure it is resting flat and evenly.

  4. 4

    Lower the height gauge jaw so that it rests on top of the object being measured. The dial will read the height. You can tighten the screw to fix the gauge's height if you will need to use it as a reference later on.

Tips and warnings

  • When measuring an object taller than the height gauge, use a block of known height to raise the overall range of the gauge.
  • Be careful when transporting and adjusting a height gauge as they are calibrated to an extremely fine degree. Even the slightest damage or surface inconsistencies could greatly increase the error of a measurement.

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