How To Adjust the Binding Settings on My Rossignol Ski

Written by melanie nozzolillo
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Adjusting the settings on your own ski bindings is a very precise and important task. Bindings transfer the power from your legs to your skis. Their responsiveness affects ski performance in turning, gaining speed and braking. Rossignol manufactures many higher-end racing as well as recreational bindings. Understanding the settings will help you ski better and more safely. If you want to adjust your own ski bindings make sure you research your particular bindings and understand ski geometry, forward tension and the release setting; otherwise, you risk serious injury.

Skill level:

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Things you need

  • Skis
  • Rossignol bindings
  • Screwdrivers (Phillips and flathead)
  • Ski boots

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    How To Adjust Settings on My Rossignol Bindings

  1. 1

    Find a DIN chart. A DIN number is the tension setting at which bindings release. It is based on the skier's height, weight, type of skiing and primary terrain. DIN charts are available online. Experienced skiers should always know their DIN setting. DIN numbers are supposed to be universal for all bindings; however, certain manufacturers such as Salomon and Marker publish their own DIN charts and have reputations for having different settings than other bindings made by Rossignol, Tyrolia and other companies.

  2. 2

    Set the forward pressure and adjust the heel position. This is the most important setting. Forward pressure is the tension setting on the toe piece of the binding. Great pressure is exerted on the toe piece during skiing. The forward pressure indicator is a small window on the ski and it is adjusted by snapping the boot into place and adjusting the heel piece until the forward pressure indicator is in the centre or slightly forward in the window. The heel piece is typically adjusted by a screw in the back of the heel. For instructions on the locations of these screws for your specific Rossignol bindings, consult the materials that came with the binding or search Internet forums on backcountry skiing.

  3. 3

    Set your DIN. Using the number from a standard DIN chart, adjust it by turning the DIN screw at the front of the toe piece until the correct number appears in the indicator window. You must understand your skiing and be very honest about your skiing, size and aggressiveness on the slopes. If the DIN is not adjusted correctly you risk a crash and severe injury; the toe piece could release unexpectedly if DIN is too low, or not at all if the DIN is too high.

  4. 4

    Check the fore/aft settings, if your Rossignol bindings have this. Some bindings can be moved slightly forward or backward to adjust for snow conditions.

  5. 5

    Check bindings every time you ski. Particularly if you are using racing bindings or have a high DIN setting, you need to check the pressure every time you hit the slopes. High DIN settings maintain internal pressure in the bindings, which can weaken if the binding sits at a high setting between ski days. Some skiers turn their DIN settings back to "0" between ski days to make sure the bindings retain their responsiveness.

Tips and warnings

  • If you have trouble finding your correct DIN, consult a Rossignol-certified ski shop about your DIN setting--although most shops will tell you to bring the skis in for adjustment due to safety and liability reasons. Research your particular Rossignol bindings. Manufacturers change setting positions every year, and, also because of liability and safety reasons, do not encourage skiers to adjust their own bindings. Online ski forums are a good source of information about particular bindings and choosing the correct settings.
  • Adjusting your own ski bindings is risky and should only be done by highly experienced skiers. An incorrect setting could result in the ski not releasing during a fall, a broken leg, or worse. Take this task very seriously. If you have any doubt, take your skis to a certified shop for adjustments.

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