How to Repair Wood Drawer Glides

Written by faith mcgee
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Sticking wood drawers are not only annoying, but they contribute to an untidy appearance to the room. Inspect the drawer by pulling it out. Find out if there is anything hindering the glides like articles of clothing or paper. Look at the bottom of the drawer to see if it is broken or damaged. Particle board is commonly used for the bottom of drawers and damages easily if anything heavy is placed in the drawer. Check to see if there is anything like a nail snagging the drawer before repairing the drawer's glides.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Things you need

  • 150-grit sand paper
  • Wood glue
  • Wax
  • Paraffin
  • Polyurethane

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Sand down with 150-grit sand paper any wood that has splintered and impeded the drawer's gliding mechanism. For large splintered wood, you can use wood glue to reattach the splintered wood.

  2. 2

    Inspect all of the corners to see if they have become unglued. Glue down any corners that are detaching from the rest of the drawer.

  3. 3

    Spread wax or paraffin on the glide of the drawer, side runners and edges of the drawer sides. Apply a thin layer and test the drawer by pushing it in and out of the dresser.

  4. 4

    Paint the drawer with polyurethane to prevent the wood from swelling from seasonal changes. Polyurethane provides a finished topcoat for wood and comes in an aerosol spray.

  5. 5

    Allow the polyurethane to dry before placing back in the drawer. Follow the directions on the canister for how long you should wait for it to dry.

Tips and warnings

  • Contact your dresser's manufacturer for parts if you need to replace the entire glide.
  • Avoid harming your the glide of your drawers by limiting how many objects you place in the drawer.

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