How to Wind a Mantle Clock With Chimes

Written by max stout
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How to Wind a Mantle Clock With Chimes
Key wound mantle clocks with chime and strike features have three arbor winding holes. (Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images)

Mantel clocks with mechanical movements require winding once a week. These clocks are often referred to as eight-day clocks and feature chimes that play at the quarter-hour and a strike mechanism that counts the hour. Each function has its own mainspring and is wound independent of the others This allows you the choice of winding the timekeeping spring only if the sound of the chime and strike aren't desired. You can wind your chiming mantel clock with the proper size clock key.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Things you need

  • Winding key

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Open the front door panel of the mantel clock.

  2. 2

    Check the position of the clock hands. If either the hour hand or the minute hand is blocking one or more arbor holes, move the minute hand only clockwise until the hands are clear of the holes.

  3. 3

    Insert the winding key into one of the three holes until it's fully seated. The centre hole arbor winds the timekeeping mechanism; the arbor to the right-of-centre winds the quarter hour chimes, and the left-of-centre arbor winds the hour-counting strike.

  4. 4

    Turn the key to determine the correct winding direction of the arbor. If the key doesn't move, then the other direction is correct. Wind the spring until it turns no further.

  5. 5

    Insert the key into the next winding hole and wind until the spring turns no further. Repeat for the remaining hole.

  6. 6

    Close the front panel door.

Tips and warnings

  • If the winding key fits loosely on the spring arbor, check with your local clock dealer or repair person to acquire the correct size key.

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