How to Write a Motorcycle Bill of Sale

Written by nicholas pell
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When buying a motorcycle, you must obtain a proper bill of sale. Writing a bill of sale only takes a few minutes and provides innumerable benefits. Registering the vehicle, or titling it if no title exists, rests upon having a clean bill of sale. Further, until registering the motorcycle with your state Department of Motor Vehicles, the bill of sale acts as both title and registration. Most importantly, a bill of sale proves a lawful transfer of ownership. There's no official form for a bill of sale. You can write it on any paper you have lying around.

Skill level:
Easy

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Write down the full name and address of the seller and the buyer. Make sure to include apartment numbers and Postcodes. Post office boxes are not preferred. In the event of more than one seller or buyer, the first seller listed includes all other parties for all legal purposes. Finally, make sure to note that the owner can legally sell the motorcycle.

  2. 2

    Make note of which party is transferring ownership of the motorcycle. Note the payment price on the bill of sale near the intention to sell. Briefly note that the full payment has been made or whatever subsequent payments are necessary.

  3. 3

    State what motorcycle is being sold. Include the make, model, year, VIN, engine number, odometer reading, and any other information that specifically identifies that motorcycle.

  4. 4

    Make note of any warranty. It is rare that personal vehicle sales have warranties. If this is the case, make sure to explicitly state that there is no warranty. Note whether or not the motorcycle has been looked at by a mechanic, and any defects the motorcycle may have.

  5. 5

    Sign and date the bill of sale. Make sure that both parties sign and date at the bottom. Don't forget to specify once again who is the seller and who is the buyer.

Tips and warnings

  • If possible, have a witness sign and date as well, although this isn't necessary.
  • Laws vary slightly from state to state. Make sure to check your local state laws so that no necessary information is left out.

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