How to Make a Cardboard Harp

Written by jessica cook
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Musical instruments provide hours of fun for kids of all ages. Your kids can make instruments at home out of simple household supplies. Teach your kids to make a harp out of cardboard, and they will be able to play beautiful music all around the house. Cardboard harps are great for Sunday school crafts, stay-at-home moms and kids, or preschool projects.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Things you need

  • Cardboard
  • Fishing line

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Cut a piece of cardboard into the shape of an octagon. The cardboard octagon should be approximately 5 inches high and 5 inches wide. Use cardboard that is thin and somewhat pliable, such as you would find from a cereal box or other pantry item.

  2. 2

    Cut the octagon in half horizontally. Now you have sufficient cardboard to make two harps. Make both, or save one as a backup in case something happens to the first.

  3. 3

    Cut slits in the edges of your cardboard, along the left and right sides. Align the slits so that they are opposite one another, and space them approximately 1 inch apart. You should have four or five slits on each side when you finish.

    If you want to decorate your cardboard harp, now is the time. Paint both sides, or use markers or crayons to draw designs on the cardboard before stringing.

  4. 4

    String the fishing line onto the harp by wrapping it around the width of the cardboard and securing it inside each slit. Pull tightly so that the cardboard bends slightly, leaving a gap between the middle of the cardboard and the centre of the fishing line strings. Tape the ends of the fishing line to the back of the harp.

  5. 5

    Let your little one make music to his heart's content. He can walk the halls of your home, strumming his harp like a wandering minstrel.

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