How to Build a Slanted Roof Storage Shed

Written by dan aragon
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Adding a storage-shed to your back yard or property can provide some much needed extra space. The slanted roof storage shed is an ideal and easy to build design for even beginning builders. This building design is for a 10-by-12 foot floor plan built using standard 2-by-4 wood studs, 3/4-inch thick vertical grooved siding and a standard 2-by-6 foot wood frame roof rafter frame to allow for a nice roof overhang.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Things you need

  • Materials
  • 35 boards, 2-by-4-by-8 foot studs
  • 10 boards, 2-by-6-by-10 foot (pressure treated)
  • 2 boards, 2-by-6-by-12 foot (pressure treated)
  • 10 boards, 2-by-6-by-14 foot (standard)
  • 2 boards, 2-by-6-by-10 foot (standard)
  • 4 sheets 4-foot-by-8 foot, 3/4-inch thick, plywood sheets
  • 5 sheets 4-foot-by-8 foot, 7/16-inch thick, OSB sheets
  • 1 roll of tar paper
  • 3/8-inch staples
  • 0.907 Kilogram 8-penny galvanised nails
  • 2.27 Kilogram of16 penny galvanised nails
  • 2-inch deck screws
  • 2-gallons exterior grade wood primer
  • 2-gallons of paint
  • Corrugated steel sheets to cover roof
  • 36-inch pre-hung door
  • Door trim material
  • Custom-cut Plexiglas
  • 1-by-2-inch trim wood
  • 1 pound finish nails
  • Tools
  • Hammer
  • Measuring tape
  • Cordless drill with attachments
  • Circular saw
  • Two saw horses
  • Speed square
  • Pencil
  • Staple hammer
  • Utility knife
  • Shovel
  • 4 Foot Level
  • Nylon String

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Instructions

    Ground Leveling and Floor Platform Framing

  1. 1

    Level the area for the shed in excess of the size of the shed. In this design the area to be levelled and cleared should be 12-by-14 feet to give extra room for movement.

  2. 2

    Frame the floor structure on 16-inch centres using pressure treated 2-by-6 boards and 16 penny galvanised nails. The actual dimensions of the floor will define the outside dimensions of your shed so be careful here and plan ahead to determine final sizes.

  3. 3

    Attach the 3/4-inch CDX plywood to the floor frame. It will help ensure that all of the corners are square. Attach the plywood using 2-inch long exterior grade screws. Place the first sheet on the floor frame at one corner with the 8-foot long direction of the plywood oriented with the 12-foot long direction of the shed. Place the second sheet of plywood diagonally across from the first.

  4. 4

    Cut and fit the other sheets of plywood to cover the remaining floor frame. It is important to stagger the plywood sheets to ensure that the seams are not all on the same line.

    Building the Walls

  1. 1

    Frame one of the walls 9-feet tall on 24 inch centres using the standard 2-by-4 studs. It has been shown in lab strength tests that 24-inch centres only reduce the overall strength of a framed wall by approximately 10 per cent but reduce material costs by up to 20 per cent compared to 16-inch centre walls.

  2. 2

    Attach one sheet of the vertically grooved 3/4-inch thick siding at each end of the wall to add rigidity and ensure the wall is square. Stand the wall up and brace it in place using a couple of long boards.

  3. 3

    Frame the other three walls 8-feet tall on 24-inch centres using standard 2-by-4 studs. Follow the same instructions in Step 1. One of the walls is to be built to accommodate a 36-inch wide pre-hung door frame.

  4. 4

    Frame the door opening to accommodate the door that you purchase but 36-inch wide should be the minimum.

  5. 5

    Add an extra 2-by-4 at each corner to act as a reinforcement nailer to secure the adjacent walls together at each corner. The corners of all of the walls should overlap covering the entire perimeter of the floor frame.

  6. 6

    Measure and trim to fit the rest of the siding for the exterior of the walls. At this point it, it is much easier to apply primer and paint so you might want to do that now, but this can always be done when the building is completed.

    Building the Roof

  1. 1

    Place each roof rafter, one at a time, across the span of the roof. This is a long span so a support beam will be used in the middle of the rafter span. The beam is built by sandwiching two 2-by-6-foot boards together and placed to support all of the roof rafters approximately at the centre of the two 12- foot-long walls.

  2. 2

    Frame the roof using 14 foot-long 2-by-6 boards that are cut to 13 foot lengths (yes there is a bit of waste but you can't buy 13 footers). The extra-long boards allow for a 12-inch overhang on the side of the shed. Frame the roof on 16-inch centres using cement coated 16-penny nails.

  3. 3

    Cover the roof rafters on top using 7/16-inch thick oriented strand board (OSB). Attaching the OSB is similar to attaching the plywood for the flooring. Make sure that the seams are staggered to add strength to the roof.

  4. 4

    Use a good primer and paint to cover the under side and edges of the eves and roof rafters.

  5. 5

    Cover the entire roof with tar (felt) paper using a staple hammer and 3/8-inch long staples. Neatly trim the roofing paper around the edges of the roof.

  6. 6

    Apply an aluminium drip edge to the perimeter of the roof line. Use corrugated steel material for the roof. It's a little more expensive but is easy to recycle and lasts much longer than standard asphalt shingles. Attach the corrugated steel material using the manufacture's recommended screws to avoid leaks.

    Finish and Trim

  1. 1

    Attach any desired trim around the framed door opening using galvanised finished nails. You can also apply trim around the roof rafters but new contemporary sheds usually forgo this step and opt for an open-roof rafter that is painted or stained.

  2. 2

    Use 1/4-inch thick Plexiglas to fill in the open sides of the slanted walls. Create a cardboard template and then have the Plexiglas custom cut by a glass shop. Use 1-by-2-inch boards to build a frame around the Plexiglas to hold it in place. Since this design does not have any other windows these areas let in natural light very nicely.

  3. 3

    Paint all exterior surfaces as desired but start by using exterior grade wood primer before applying any paint to seal the surfaces for exterior use.

  4. 4

    Build the interior to suit your specific needs. Add shelving and maybe a work bench for utility purposes. You may not want to get it dirty after all your hard work. Paint the entire interior with a neutral colour.

Tips and warnings

  • Add solar-powered lights and automatic solar-powered vent fans

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