How to space when planting vinca minor

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Vinca minor, also called periwinkle and creeping myrtle, is a creeping ground cover used to prevent erosion on slopes and to cover bare areas under trees and shrubs and around flowerbeds. Vinca minor is hardy in zones 3 to 8 prefers well-drained loamy soil and will thrive in sun and part to full shade.

In spring, the plant is covered in pale blue, white or purple flowers which can last for several months. The rest of the year this plant is evergreen with its glossy green foliage shading out weeds. Staggered rows is the easiest method to use when spacing vinca minor. Each plant should be equidistant from its neighbours with plants spaced closer together filling in areas quicker.

Skill level:

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Things you need

  • Ruler
  • Hand trowel

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  1. 1

    Space vinca minor 6 inches apart on all sides for complete coverage in 2 years. Space 12 to 18 inches apart on all sides for coverage in 3 to 4 years.

  2. 2

    Measure 6 to 18 inches from the edge of the area you want to cover. This is where your first plant will go. It's easiest to work from right to left and top to bottom. Use a hand trowel to plant the vinca as soon as you have the correct measurement.

  3. 3

    Continue planting in a row spacing plants 6 to 18 inches apart.

  4. 4

    Stagger the second row by measuring 12 to 36 inches in from the edge and 6 to 18 inches from the previous row. The third row will be 6 to 18 inches from the edge and 6 to 18 inches from the second row. Plant (use the same measurements) the 4th row as you would the second.

  5. 5

    Continue to stagger rows until the entire area is planted.

Tips and warnings

  • Inter-plant flowering bulbs to break up the monotony of a large vinca minor planting.
  • Cut vinca minor back by one-half using a lawnmower to encourage thicker, bushier growth.
  • Vinca minor is invasive. Plant it where natural barriers like stone or concrete paths and raised beds will keep its spread in check.
  • Vinca minor spreads by forming roots where ever its stems touch soil. This means plant barriers (solid plastic sheets driven 6 to 8 inches vertically into the ground) will not contain it.

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