How to Plant Lily of the Valley Bulbs

Written by allan robinson
  • Share
  • Tweet
  • Share
  • Email

Lily of the Valley (Convallaria majalis) is a member of the lily family and is primarily native to cool temperate regions in Asia and Europe. It's a popular garden plant known for its distinctive scent and ability to grow in the shade. Lily of the Valley grows readily in a variety of conditions and may be considered a weed by some gardeners.

Skill level:
Moderate

Other People Are Reading

Things you need

  • Compost
  • Garden trowel
  • Water
  • Lily of the Valley bulbs
  • Scissors

Show MoreHide

Instructions

  1. 1

    Select a location. A good location to plant Lily of the Valley bulbs should drain completely within five to six hours after a heavy rain. You can improve the drainage of a site by raising its level with two to three inches of compost, peat moss or aged manure. Lily of the Valley prefers light to moderate shade.

  2. 2

    Refrigerate Lily of the Valley bulbs for at least six weeks in cool climates and up to nine weeks in warm climates. Prepare the bulbs within seven to ten days of removing them from a refrigerated environment. Add lukewarm water to the plastic bag that contains your bulbs until the peat moss is completely saturated. Keep the bag in your kitchen sink for two hours so that the bulbs swell and become hard.

  3. 3

    Plant the bulbs. Snip one inch of the roots from the bulbs and push them into the soil so that the tops are just slightly above the surface. The bulbs should be spaced about 1.5 feet apart.

  4. 4

    Water the soil liberally to ensure the soil is soaked. Lily of the Valley bulbs can form top growth within a week under ideal circumstances and should cover any available ground quickly. Continue to water as needed to keep the soil moist.

  5. 5

    Maintain the foliage. You can remove any yellow leaves that appear during the growing season for cosmetic purposes. But do not remove any green leaves; they produce food for the bulb. allow all green leaves to remain on the plant. You can cut the flowers while they're in bloom without harming the plant.

Don't Miss

Filter:
  • All types
  • Articles
  • Slideshows
  • Videos
Sort:
  • Most relevant
  • Most popular
  • Most recent

No articles available

No slideshows available

No videos available

By using the eHow.co.uk site, you consent to the use of cookies. For more information, please see our Cookie policy.