How to make fried bread

Fried bread is a common British staple. The basic ingredients are available in your kitchen, and a variety of recipes exist. Make rewarding homemade fried bread by making your own dough. Fried bread requires few ingredients and a little effort to make. It is a meal in itself, or you can serve it with your favourite meal.

Sift flour, baking powder, salt and sugar in a mixing bowl.

Mix in 1 1/2 tablespoons of softened butter with the dry ingredients.

Heat the milk in the microwave or on the hob. Add the warm milk to the mixing bowl.

Knead the ingredients with your hands to form a dough ball. Continue to knead the dough on a floured surface until it is soft and has an elastic texture.

Form into 8 dough balls. Make the dough balls even in size.

Melt 2 tablespoons of butter. Brush the tops of the dough balls with melted butter.

Allow the dough balls to sit for 35 minutes at room temperature. The dough balls will rise slightly during this time.

Roll and flatten each dough ball out to 6 mm (1/4 inch) thick. The flattened dough will be about 15 cm (6 inches) in diameter.

Add dough to 185 degree C (365 degree F) heated oil. Use a deep fryer for this method or heat oil in a large pot.

Watch fried dough as it cooks. The fried dough will rise to the top while it is cooking. When one side browns, carefully turn the bread to its other side to brown.

Place fried bread on a paper towel. The paper towel absorbs the excess grease. Serve fried bread while it is still hot.


Allow dough to rise for fluffier fried bread. Fry the bread in used oil to decrease the strong oil taste. Add yeast to the bread dough to allow dough to rise faster. Do not over-handle the dough. Serve fried bread with honey.

Things You'll Need

  • 375 g (3 cups) all-purpose flour
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 2 tsp sugar
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • Mixing bowl
  • 3 1/2 tbsp butter
  • 177 3/4 ml (3/4 cup) milk
  • Cooking oil
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About the Author

Angela LaFollette holds a Bachelor of Arts in advertising with a minor in political science from Marshall University. LaFollette found her passion for writing during an internship as a reporter for "The West Virginia Standard" in 2007. She has more than six years of writing experience and specializes in topics in garden and pets.