How to write a business tender

Written by contributing writer
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A business tender is an offer to perform a certain job or provide certain goods for a specific price. Business tenders are usually written in response to a call for bids on a project, and they can be as simple as a basic quote for a small job and as complex as the documents usually required when bidding on big jobs or contracts. Well-written business tenders help companies acquire new contracts and stay profitable.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • Word-processing program
  • Information about the job or contract you want to bid on

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Be clear about the services or products your company provides and determine if the opportunity matches your company’s capabilities.

  2. 2

    Make sure you understand what the project and the client require.

  3. 3

    Determine if the project you hope to secure with the business tender will be a money maker for your company. Will it open the door to other opportunities in the future? Do you have the human and other resources to perform the job to the client’s satisfaction?

  4. 4

    Design your business tender to demonstrate how your company can fulfil the client’s job requirements. Be as specific as possible.

  5. 5

    Conclude the document by emphasising how your company has had past success with other clients requesting similar services. Place your sales pitch at the end and reiterate your ability to deliver on your promises.

Tips and warnings

  • Consider using writers experienced in crafting business tenders until you learn how to do it.
  • Get feedback on your bid proposals to help you better understand the customer’s needs.
  • Make sure to understand the competition you will face.
  • Tenders can be disqualified if they do not make the submission deadline.

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