How to treat chicken pox

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How to treat chicken pox
Treat Chicken Pox

Chicken pox is a viral infection that causes a blister-like rash on your skin; you can even get pox inside your mouth and under your eyelids. Young children will generally have milder symptoms than adults.

Skill level:

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Things you need

  • Children's Nail Clippers
  • Infant/children's Mittens/gloves
  • Old Nylon Stockings
  • Oatmeal
  • Aveeno
  • Acetaminophen
  • Calamine Lotions
  • Cold Compresses

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  1. 1

    Place cool, wet compresses on the rash to relieve the itching and burning.

  2. 2

    Use calamine lotion to soothe the itching.

  3. 3

    Take a bath in oatmeal, which is very soothing to the skin. A commercial oatmeal bath such as Aveeno will not clog your drain. If you use regular oatmeal, put it inside a nylon stocking and hold it under the running bathwater.

  4. 4

    Trim a young child's or baby's fingernails so she doesn't scratch the rash.

  5. 5

    Consider putting mitts on a baby's hands.

  6. 6

    Use acetaminophen to reduce fever, aches and pains.

  7. 7

    Eat soft foods and avoid acidic juices if there are pox inside your mouth.

  8. 8

    Stick to a nutritious diet to boost the immune system.

Tips and warnings

  • Chicken pox is considered contagious until all the pox are crusted over. It usually runs its course within two weeks.
  • Keep infected children away from frail elderly people, newborn infants and pregnant women.
  • Contact your health care provider if you contract chicken pox as an adult.
  • Contact your provider if you or your child have pox in your eyes and are in pain; if there is pain in your joints; or if the sores appear to be infected.
  • Avoid aspirin in children under 18 due to the risk of Reye's syndrome.
  • If symptoms persist or if you have specific medical conditions or concerns, we recommend you contact a physician. This information is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice or treatment.

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