How to make a sweatband

Written by aksana nikolai
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How to make a sweatband
(http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Schwei%C3%9Fband.jpg)

A sweatband is a must-have accessory for every athlete and anyone else who regularly spends long periods of time working outside in the hot sun. Aside from absorbing any perspiration, sweatbands can also help keep the hair out of your face. With that said, these practical accessories are not always inexpensive. Try making your own sweatband from the pant leg of an old pair of sweatpants. You will not only save yourself some money but also get one last use from your old sweatpants before throwing them out.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • Pair of old sweatpants
  • Scissors
  • Paper clip
  • Needle
  • Thread

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Decide which part of the sweatpants you will use for your project. Fabric from the area surrounding the knee will be suitable for most adults' headbands. However, you may need to use fabric from the mid-thigh area if you have a large head. The bottom of each leg that is cinched at the ankle is suitable for wristbands.

  2. 2

    Use scissors to cut through both layers of the pant-leg fabric from one edge to the other. You should end up with an uninterrupted, circular band of fabric. Sweatbands typically measure between 3/4 and 2 inches wide, but feel free to make your sweatband slightly wider or narrower. Be sure to add approximately 1 inch to your desired width before you cut your fabric.

  3. 3

    Fold a length of fabric measuring approximately 1/2 inch from the top and bottom edges onto the inside of the band.

  4. 4

    Place a paper clip over the folded edge to keep the two layers of fabric together. Use a straight stitch to attach this length to the inside of the band, thus ensuring that the edges are neat and do not begin to fray.

Tips and warnings

  • To add a decorative element to your homemade sweatband, sew the edges with thread whose colour stands out against the colour of the fabric.

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